Irish Citizens Decide: A Review of the Irish Convention on the Constitution

A free event to be held at UCD Newman House, November 13, 2015, 9.30am-1.00pm

To register, see here

Ireland’s Convention on the Constitution, which met from late 2012 to early 2014, was a world first both in allowing ordinary citizens a place in discussions about the future of our Constitution and also due to its role in the calling of the marriage referendum earlier this year.

This half-day seminar – which has been supported by the Department of the Taoiseach – will review the work, operation and outcomes of the Convention. The panelists will include former members and organisers of the Convention, the academic team who supported and monitored its operation, and journalists who provided critical coverage of it.

Programme

9.30 arrive and registration

9.45: Welcome and introduction: Prof Ken Carty (research director of the British Columbia citizens’ assembly) will make some opening remarks

10.00: Panel discussion on the Convention and its outcomes. Confirmed participants include: Tom Arnold (Chair of the Convention), Art O’Leary (Secretary), Dr Jane Suiter (DCU), Dearbhail McDonald (Legal Editor, Irish Independent), and Senator Katherine Zappone, Deirdre Donaghy and Aideen Larkin (three members of the Convention).

11.30: tea/coffee break

12.00: What can we learn from the Irish Constitutional Convention? A presentation of research findings by the academic team who supported the work of the Convention.

13.00: End of workshop. A free lunch will be provided.

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3 thoughts on “Irish Citizens Decide: A Review of the Irish Convention on the Constitution

    • It would be an equally good idea, if the organisers of this event were to give much more notice of it. An event with the speakers listed must surely have been organised months ago, given the committments of all involved. There are many others – non-insiders/non-academics – who are interested in enhancing how we govern ourselves.

      • I agree, and add, what about citizens who do not have access to computers or social media? Have schools been notified about this, do younger citizens get the opportunity to have a say? The DCYA’ s recent national strategy promotes children and young people’s participation in decision making processes, the lack of advanced notice about this event demonstrates the tokenism surrounding this.

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